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From Different Roads: Guest Article: “Wandering and Autism” by Sarah Kupferschmidt, MA, BCBA

May 15, 2014 -- 10:14 am
There are compelling statistics today that highlight the need to address the issue of our children wandering and going missing. The safety of chidren with autism is an enormous concern for parents and caregivers alike. Last month, we shared BCBA Sam Blanco’s interview with Gary Weitzen on safety, wandering, and emergency planning for individuals on the spectrum. This week, we’re thrilled to bring you a guest article by Sarah Kupferschmidt, MA, BCBA. Sarah has written a wonderfully informative article on how to use the Behavior Skills Training framework to teach your child help-seeking behavior in cases of wandering.
Wandering and Autism
by Sarah Kupferschmidt, MA, BCBA

We seem to be hearing about more and more cases of children with autism wandering and going missing in the media. In some of these cases the children were reunited safely with their families, but in many unfortunate instances, tragedy ensued. There is evidence to suggest that this may be more common than most people realize. The Interactive Autism Network (IAN) and the Kennedy Krieger Institute published a study in 2012, in the Journal of Pediatricson this very topic. According to the study, 49% of the parents that were interviewed reported that their child with autism had wandered or bolted. Moreover, more than half of those children that did wander actually went missing. Compelling numbers aside, what I found even more important about the results of this study was that for obvious reasons parents reported that they were experiencing high levels of stress related to the prospect of their child wandering, but, they were also feeling helpless to a certain extent because they felt that they did not know what they could do about the wandering.

To read the entire article, please click: There are compelling statistics today that highlight the need to address the issue of our children wandering and going missing. The safety of chidren with autism is an enormous concern for parents and caregivers alike. Last month, we shared BCBA Sam Blanco’s interview with Gary Weitzen on safety, wandering, and emergency planning for individuals on the spectrum. This week, we’re thrilled to bring you a guest article by Sarah Kupferschmidt, MA, BCBA. Sarah has written a wonderfully informative article on how to use the Behavior Skills Training framework to teach your child help-seeking behavior in cases of wandering.
Wandering and Autism
by Sarah Kupferschmidt, MA, BCBA

We seem to be hearing about more and more cases of children with autism wandering and going missing in the media. In some of these cases the children were reunited safely with their families, but in many unfortunate instances, tragedy ensued. There is evidence to suggest that this may be more common than most people realize. The Interactive Autism Network (IAN) and the Kennedy Krieger Institute published a study in 2012, in the Journal of Pediatricson this very topic. According to the study, 49% of the parents that were interviewed reported that their child with autism had wandered or bolted. Moreover, more than half of those children that did wander actually went missing. Compelling numbers aside, what I found even more important about the results of this study was that for obvious reasons parents reported that they were experiencing high levels of stress related to the prospect of their child wandering, but, they were also feeling helpless to a certain extent because they felt that they did not know what they could do about the wandering.There are compelling statistics today that highlight the need to address the issue of our children wandering and going missing. The safety of chidren with autism is an enormous concern for parents and caregivers alike. Last month, we shared BCBA Sam Blanco’s interview with Gary Weitzen on safety, wandering, and emergency planning for individuals on the spectrum. This week, we’re thrilled to bring you a guest article by Sarah Kupferschmidt, MA, BCBA. Sarah has written a wonderfully informative article on how to use the Behavior Skills Training framework to teach your child help-seeking behavior in cases of wandering.
Wandering and Autism
by Sarah Kupferschmidt, MA, BCBA

We seem to be hearing about more and more cases of children with autism wandering and going missing in the media. In some of these cases the children were reunited safely with their families, but in many unfortunate instances, tragedy ensued. There is evidence to suggest that this may be more common than most people realize. The Interactive Autism Network (IAN) and the Kennedy Krieger Institute published a study in 2012, in the Journal of Pediatricson this very topic. According to the study, 49% of the parents that were interviewed reported that their child with autism had wandered or bolted. Moreover, more than half of those children that did wander actually went missing. Compelling numbers aside, what I found even more important about the results of this study was that for obvious reasons parents reported that they were experiencing high levels of stress related to the prospect of their child wandering, but, they were also feeling helpless to a certain extent because they felt that they did not know what they could do about the wandering. To read the entire article please click: http://blog.difflearn.com/?utm_medium=email&utm_source=Guest+Article%3A+Wandering+and+Autism&utm_campaign=Guest+Article%3A+%22Wandering+and+Autism%22+by+Sarah+Kupferschmidt%2C+MA%2C+BCBA

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